Alaska Sea Grant

Resources

PLANNING A FIELD TRIP with community partners

Tips on Organizing a School Field Trip
Beach Etiquette
Rules about Collecting and Harvesting on Beaches
Involving Community Partners in the School Native Elders, scientists, other community resource people

LINKS 

Links to Alaska Seas and Watersheds field trip activities, hand-outs, Science Notebook pages, and datasheets

Webinar for K-12 educators: “It Takes a Watershed . . . to Grow a Salmon” Review of Alaska salmon life cycles, use of different parts of the watershed, and salmon-human connections, and recent research about potential climate change impacts on salmon habitat. Presenters are Laurel Devaney, retired U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service fisheries education specialist, and Sue Mauger, Science Director, Cook InletKeeper. Teaching tips on use of the information in teaching Alaska Seas and Watershed units at various grade levels are included. 3/21/2016

Resources for water quality monitoring by students

PLANNING A SCHOOL OR COMMUNITY CELEBRATION OF SEAS AND WATERSHEDS

Celebrating Alaska Seas and Watersheds in Your School and Community

STEWARDSHIP PROJECT IDEAS

  • Participate in a beach or stream clean-up.  Figure out the major sources of the litter or marine debris and brainstorm and action plan to reduce the amount of litter or debris that might harm fish or wildlife (Examples:  a public awareness campaign, trash containers at key places).
  • Participate in a stream restoration project such as planting vegetation on stream banks where erosion is a problem.
  • Paint signs for storm drains to alert people that it drains to  a salmon stream.
  • Place “Baby-Salmon-Live-Here” signs next to a stream. (Biodegradeable signs available from The Salmon Project at http://www.salmonproject.org/babysalmonlivehere)
  • Start a recycling program if your school doesn’t have one. 
  • Find out how plastics are being used and disposed by your school or community. Start a campaign to reduce use of plastics through re-use and recycling or finding alternatives (e.g., cloth bags for plastic bags).  For plastics that can’t be recycled, look for ways to reduce the amount that ends  up in local wetlands, ponds, streams, or on beaches.
  • Research a local environmental issue that is causing harm to aquatic and/or marine life. Brainstorm solutions and strategies to solve the problem. Strategies could include:
    -  Making a presentation at a parent night at your school or at a community meeting
    -  Developing and distributing  fliers or posters
    -  Writing news articles
    -  Developing and recording radio spots.
    -  Writing a letter and/or petition to an elected officials requesting a change in policies or regulations that affect the health of the local environment.
  • Look for ways that people are helping salmon or working to maintain the health of Alaska’s wetlands, streams, or the ocean. Write thank you letters and ask how you can help.
  • Participate in a citizen science or other local environmental monitoring project.

WE AWAIT YOUR IDEAS AND PROJECTS WHICH WILL BE POSTED TO THIS LIST!

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